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Last updated: 4/28/2006 4:17:33 PM
California Western -- Jan Stiglitz
Courses Taught - Jan Stiglitz

Civil Procedure I & II

Torts I

California Innocence Project I & II

Internship Seminar


CIVIL PROCEDURE I & II (3 units each)
The rules governing a lawsuit from its beginning to trial.  Topics covered include jurisdiction, pleadings, motions, joinder of claims and parties, discovery, and the effect of judgments.
  
TORTS I (3 units)
Examines theories of civil liability for harm, including negligence, intentional wrongdoing and participation in abnormally dangerous activity.  Specific torts studied include assault, battery, false imprisonment, intentional inflection of emotional distress, negligence (including medical malpractice and liability of owners and occupiers of land), and nuisance.  Defenses to tort actions are also considered, including contributory negligence, assumption of risk and consent.  Must be followed by Torts II.
  
CALIFORNIA INNOCENCE PROJECT I & II (PRAC, 5 units each)
The California Innocence Project is a two term course in which law students work alongside practicing criminal defense lawyers to seek the release of wrongfully convicted prisoners in the state of California.  Law students investigate cases where there is strong evidence of innocence, research the law pertaining to the cases, and write briefs and post-conviction petitions.  The course includes two 1 hour classroom sessions each week and the students will receive three credits for each of the two term commitment.  There is no final exam.  Students are graded on the written work they produce in the course.  The project is modeled after The Innocence Project founded by Barry Scheck and Peter Neufield at Cardozo Law School and works cooperatively with the Cardozo program.
  
INTERNSHIP SEMINAR (PRAC, 1 unit)
This Seminar provides a forum for student interns to discuss their internship experiences with one another on a weekly basis.  These seminar meetings are in addition to individual private meetings with faculty supervisors.  Students are required to keep a daily journal and do short weekly readings on current topics related to the practice of law.  Topics include Advocacy, Law Reform, Ethics, and Equality.  Emphasis is on the often conflicting moral, professional, financial, personal and political values inherent in the profession.  There is no final exam or other written work requirement.  Enrollment may be limited.


Full course descriptions are available in PDF format on the J.D. Curriculum page.

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